ADVERTISEMENT

Monsoon Munchies: 5 Uncommon and Delicious Pakora Recipes for the Rains

Try these easy and delicious pakora recipes this monsoon while watching the rain fall and you’ll be in heaven,

Published
Fit
4 min read
Monsoon Munchies: 5 Uncommon and Delicious Pakora Recipes for the Rains
i

There is something extremely cosy and happy about relishing chai with pakoras while watching the pitter-patter of the rain drops. The heat of the summer has abated, and the climate is cooler. The dark threatening clouds look gorgeous.

The trees sway, thunder cracks, and somewhere the peacock calls. This is the best time to enjoy a cup of tea with deep-fried pakoras.

Call it anything - pakora, pakora, bhajiya, bhajji, bonda, or vada, it is basically one dish with many names prepared with an assortment of vegetables, edible flowers, dals, and flours. Every region in India boasts of a special pakora and every Indian city has a popular shop selling unique pakoras.

Well-known nutritionist Rujuta Diwekar believes that monsoons are the best time to consume fried food. She feels chai and pakora are good for you in this season.
ADVERTISEMENT

What Ayurveda Says

According to Ayurveda, any deep-fried food can aggravate kapha and pitta. However, it is considered good for vata as it is opposite to the light and dry qualities of vata. If you have a sluggish digestive system, it will be difficult for you to digest. Adding asafoetida and carrom seeds aid digestion. Pakoras should be consumed in moderation while being mindful of your doshas.

Recipes You Should Try

Pakoras are prepared from two major ingredients: potato and another vegetable or meat of choice, which are then dipped in flour and deep-fried in ghee/vegetable oil

(Photo: iStock)

Every family has a favourite pakora recipe. Try these recipes this season apart from the regular ones.

Aloo Chutney Pakora

Regardless of the name, pakoras are a delicious appetiser or snack that go well with chutneys and a hot cup of tea on the side 

(Photo: iStock)

Ingredients

  • 6 potatoes boiled (cooked but firm)

  • 1 cup green chutney (Grind coriander leaves, green chillies, 2 tsp of roasted sesame seeds, salt and cumin seeds)

  • 1 cup red chutney (Grind 1 cup dry coconut, 10 garlic cloves, salt and red chilli powder)

  • 3 cups besan

  • ½ tsp turmeric powder

  • ½ tsp carrom seeds

  • Salt to taste

  • Oil for frying

Method

  1. Slice the potatoes (1 cm thick)

  2. Make a batter by adding salt, turmeric powder and carrom seeds to the besan. Add 2 tbsp of hot oil and mix well

  3. Take two potato slices. Apply green chutney on one slice and red chutney on the other. Join the chutney sides together

  4. Heat oil

  5. Dip the joined potato slices in the batter and fry until golden

  6. Serve hot with a cup of hot tea

  7. This pakora needs no chutney

Bhutta Pakora

With this weekend special bhutta pakora, you may enjoy this Indian experience

(Photo: iStock)

Bhutta arrives in heaps at the markets in India during the rains. Try these pakoras - they have the crunch, flavour, and taste.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 kg fresh bhutta (corn kernels)

  • 3 green chillies

  • ½ tsp turmeric powder

  • 1 tsp cumin seeds

  • ½ tsp red chilli powder

  • 2 tbsp besan

  • 1 cup of fresh coriander chopped

  • Salt to taste

  • Oil for frying

Method

  1. Grate the corn kernels.

  2. Add green chillies and cumin seeds. Blend it into a coarse paste

  3. Add all the ingredients except the oil. Mix well

  4. Heat oil

  5. Add 1 tbsp hot oil to the corn mixture and mix

  6. Add about 1 tsp of mixture to the oil to make pakoras.

  7. These puff up well. Fry until golden

  8. Serve hot with green chutney.

Bhindi Pakoras

This bhindi pakora recipe is delicious. A soft pakora that's tasty and filling, and really highlights the unique flavour and texture of okra

(Photo: iStock)

Bhindi or ladies finger fritters are easy to make and taste great.

Method

  1. Wash and dry the ladyfinger.

  2. Cut it lengthwise.

  3. Make besan batter with regular seasoning and add a pinch of mango powder

  4. Dip the pieces and fry in hot oil.

  5. Crispy and yummy pakoras are ready to be served.

Tori Pakora

Sponge gourd fritters, also known as gilki bhaji, bajji, or pakora, are an Indian delicacy served with tomato ketchup

(Photo: iStock)

Sponge gourd or tori is not a popular vegetable, but delightful pakoras can be prepared with it. These are the easiest to make.

Method

  1. Wash, peel and thinly slice the sponge gourd.

  2. Make a smooth batter of chickpea flour with turmeric powder, chilli powder, chopped coriander, and salt.

  3. Add one tbsp of hot oil and mix.

  4. Then dip the gourd slices individually and fry in hot oil.

  5. Serve with any green chutney. The crispness of the outer covering compliments the subtle softness of the gourd making it yummy.

ADVERTISEMENT

Gudhal ke Pakore

Hibiscus blooms are delicious raw, pickled, or boiled. In India, they are used to produce sweet, iced beverages or baked into cakes and yes, pakoras too

(Photo: iStock)

Hibiscus flower pakoras taste great. You need about 5-6 fresh flowers.

Method

  1. Remove the centre part and separate the petals

  2. Make a smooth but thick batter of chickpea flour with salt, red chilli powder and turmeric powder

  3. Dip a petal and coat it well with the batter

  4. Fry it on a medium flame in hot oil

  5. Serve with any chutney

Tips to Make Awesome Pakoras

Pakoras are traditionally most popular in the spring, when villagers enjoy fried meals to commemorate the monsoon season.

(Photo: iStock)

  • The pakora batter should be smooth and neither too thick nor thin.

  • Adding 1 tsp of rice flour and 2 tbsp of hot oil to the batter makes pakoras crispy

  • Avoid adding baking powder or soda to the batter

  • Oil for frying should be hot but shouldn’t reach the smoking point.

  • Add only the required quantity of oil. More can be added if required.

  • Discard the remaining oil after frying the pakoras. It is unhealthy

  • Eat them fresh. Refrain from frying the pakoras again.

Pakoras and fritters are universal favourites. This crunchy snack is the flavour of the Indian monsoon.

Try these recipes to enjoy the season!

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

Speaking truth to power requires allies like you.
Become a Quint Insider
25
100
200

or more

PREMIUM

3 months
12 months
12 months
Check Insider Benefits
ADVERTISEMENT
Stay Updated

Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter And Get News Delivered Straight To Your Inbox.

Join over 120,000 subscribers!
ADVERTISEMENT
×
×