Pro-Ukraine Protesters in Poland Demanded No-Fly Zone; Why is NATO Unrelenting?

Direct engagement with Russia is the last thing that NATO wants at the moment.
The Quint
World
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Pro-Ukraine protestors demanded that NATO enforce a no-fly zone over Ukraine and provide it with fighter jets. 

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(Photo: Deepa Parent/The Quint, altered by Vibhushita Singh)

<div class="paragraphs"><p>Pro-Ukraine protestors demanded that NATO enforce a no-fly zone over Ukraine and provide it with fighter jets.&nbsp;</p></div>
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Russia's invasion of Ukraine has inspired anti-war protests and rallies all over the world. One such rally was held last week on 25 March in Warsaw, Poland, before the arrival of US President Joe Biden.

The protestors demanded that NATO enforce a no-fly zone over Ukraine and provide it with fighter jets, according to local Ukrainian media outlet The Kyiv Independent.

Pro-Ukraine protestors in front of the Palace of Culture and Science. 

Pro-Ukraine protestors in front of the Palace of Culture and Science. 

Even Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has been urging the US and NATO to stop Russia's rockets and bombs from destroying Ukraine by means of a no-fly zone.

During his speech to the US Congress, Zelenskyy had wondered if a no-fly zone was "too much to ask". Indeed, the war has been going for more than a month and a no-fly zone still hasn't been initiated.

Why could this be the case?

Recap: What is a No-Fly Zone? 

A no-fly zone is a secure area established by a country's military or an alliance over which certain aircraft are not allowed to fly.

It is, during times of conflict, imposed in order to prevent an adversary from attacking or surveilling the country that is being protected by the no-fly zone.

The important thing to note is that a no-fly zone has to be enforced, that too by military means.

That implies that if, hypothetically, NATO does impose a no-fly zone on Ukrainian skies, it would have to shoot down Russian aircraft that are flying in those restricted skies.

Pro-Ukraine protestors in front of the Palace of Culture and Science. 

Pro-Ukraine protestors in front of the Palace of Culture and Science. 

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Why Are the US and NATO Hesitant?

Direct engagement with Russia is the last thing that NATO wants at the moment.

If a NATO member nation does shoot down a Russian aircraft, the Kremlin will undoubtedly retaliate against that country.

That retaliation will trigger Article 5 of the NATO treaty, which guarantees collective defence for all its member nations, and that would transform what is now a localised war to a full-blown European war.

Not all hope, however, is lost for Ukraine.

It's been more than a month since the Russian invasion began, but Russia still doesn't have air superiority over Ukraine.

The lack of air power being employed by the Russian Aerospace Forces (VKS) have stunned observers.

You can read more about why Russia doesn't control the sky over Ukraine here.

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

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