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Taliban Member Says 'Council May Rule Afghanistan': Report

Taliban’s supreme leader, Haibatullah Akhundzada, is, however, likely to remain in overall charge.

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World
1 min read
<div class="paragraphs"><p>Taliban fighters in front of the Hamid Karzai International Airport, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Image used for representation purpose.</p></div>
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Afghanistan may now be governed by a ruling council, Waheedullah Hashimi a senior member of the militant group told news agency Reuters. He also said that Taliban’s supreme leader, Haibatullah Akhundzada, is, however, likely to remain in overall charge.

Akhundzada, as per Hashimi, is likely to play a role above the head of the council. The role is expected to be like that of the country's president

Hashimi further went on to tell Reuters that Taliban would also reach out to former pilots and soldiers from the Afghan armed forces to join its ranks.

As per the news agency, Hashimi has access to the group's decision-making.

The power structure that Hashimi outlined for Reuters seems similar to how Afghanistan was run between 1996 and 2001, when the Taliban was perviously in power .

During that period, the then supreme leader Mullah Omar remained in the shadows and left the daily running of the country to a council.

Taliban seized control of Afghanistan on Sunday evening, with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani fleeing the war-torn country.

Video footage of Taliban commanders and armed militants moving within the walls of the presidential palace was broadcast by international media organisations on Sunday evening.

Meanwhile, swarms of people attempted to escape the impending Taliban rule, as is apparent from the visuals of panic, fear and chaos that emerged from the crowded airport of Kabul.

(With inputs from Reuters.)

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

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