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Explained | 8 Big ICC Rule Changes & How They Will Affect The Future of Cricket

The new ICC rule changes will come into effect from Saturday, 1 October, 2022.

Updated
Cricket
4 min read
Explained | 8 Big ICC Rule Changes & How They Will Affect The Future of Cricket
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The use of saliva to polish the ball was on Tuesday, 20 September, banned permanently as the ICC announced a slew of changes to its Playing Conditions, which will come into effect on 1 October.

The game's governing body also changed running out of the non-striker by the bowler from the 'Unfair Play' section to the 'Run out' section.

The changes were announced after the Chief Executives' Committee (CEC) ratified recommendations made by the ICC Cricket Committee, led by former India captain and BCCI president Sourav Ganguly.

Today we dive into and explain the ICC's new rules.

Explained | 8 Big ICC Rule Changes & How They Will Affect The Future of Cricket

  1. 1. Rule 1. Batters Returning When Caught

    When a batter is out caught, the new batter will come in at the end the striker is, regardless of whether the batters crossed prior to the catch being taken.

    Implication: In close games, this rule will be gold dust for the bowling teams. Often when the last couple of wickets are left and at least one established batter at the non-striker's end, normally during a catch the crossing over would give a distinct advantage to the set batter. But the rule change means that at the fall of ninth wicket due to a catch, No. 11 will have to take strike.

    Rule 2: No Use of Saliva to Polish Ball

    This prohibition has been in place for over two years in international cricket as a COVID-related temporary measure, and it is considered appropriate for the ban to be made permanent.

    Implication: The saliva is heavier than body sweat and over decades, it has helped bowlers use it as one of the methods to keep the shine on one side and make it heavier as the other side scruffs up. That is how reverse swing came into play and if one looks at the Test matches in last two years, conventional swing is taking over reverse in red ball format.

    Expand
  2. 2. Rule 3: Incoming Batter Ready to Face the Ball

    An incoming batter will now be required to be ready to take strike within two minutes in Tests and ODIs, while the current threshold of ninety seconds in T20Is remains unchanged.

    Implications: This is done to avoid deliberate time wasting tactics, especially in close Test matches on the fifth day, when a team batting in the fourth innings during final stages tries to delay proceedings.

    Rule 4: Striker's Right to Play the Ball

    This is restricted so as to require some part of their bat or person to remain within the pitch. Should they venture beyond that, the umpire will call and signal dead ball. Any ball which would force the batter to leave the pitch will also be called no ball.

    Implications: There is no such significance as this is very, very rare at the highest level.

    Expand
  3. 3. Rule 5: Unfair Movement by the Fielding Side

    Any unfair and deliberate movement while the bowler is running in to bowl could now result in the umpire awarding five penalty runs to the batting side, in addition to it being called a dead ball.

    Implications: Fielders normally back up and cover some ground, but that would now be deemed unfair if it happens before the delivery is completed. Some quick singles inside the circle, that used to be saved, might not be otherwise.

    Expand
  4. 4. Rule 6: Running Out of The Non-Striker

    The playing conditions follow the laws in moving this method of effecting a run out from the 'unfair play' section to the 'run out' section.

    Implication: The rule has always been in place, but it is the bowler who has got the stick from the cricket community as the Australians and English saw it as going against the spirit of cricket. Bowlers have been judged over the years for what is deemed legal in letter but not in spirit. It will change now.

    Expand
  5. 5. Rule 7: Bowler Throwing Towards Striker's End Before Delivery

    Previously, a bowler who saw the batter advancing down the wicket before entering their delivery stride, could throw the ball in an attempt to run out the striker. This practice will now be called a dead ball.

    Implication: Nothing much as most bowlers aren't seen using this ploy. Especially fast bowlers are in motion, and even if they find a batter giving charge while loading up, it's difficult to pull out of the action as it could cause injuries.

    Expand
  6. 6. Rule 8: Consequences of Slow Over Rate

    The in-match penalty introduced in T20Is in January 2022 (whereby the failure of a fielding team to bowl their overs by the scheduled cessation time leads to an additional fielder having to be brought inside the fielding circle for the remaining overs of the innings), will also be adopted in ODI matches after the completion of the ICC Men's World Cup Super League in 2023.

    Implication: The teams are now taking nearly four hours at times to complete the 50 overs knowing that only a token financial penalty is in place, and that too, paid by the boards. This rule would mean that one less fielder outside the 30-yard circle in last two or three overs could massively impact the game. Especially for sides defending.

    (At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

    Expand

Rule 1. Batters Returning When Caught

When a batter is out caught, the new batter will come in at the end the striker is, regardless of whether the batters crossed prior to the catch being taken.

Implication: In close games, this rule will be gold dust for the bowling teams. Often when the last couple of wickets are left and at least one established batter at the non-striker's end, normally during a catch the crossing over would give a distinct advantage to the set batter. But the rule change means that at the fall of ninth wicket due to a catch, No. 11 will have to take strike.

Rule 2: No Use of Saliva to Polish Ball

This prohibition has been in place for over two years in international cricket as a COVID-related temporary measure, and it is considered appropriate for the ban to be made permanent.

Implication: The saliva is heavier than body sweat and over decades, it has helped bowlers use it as one of the methods to keep the shine on one side and make it heavier as the other side scruffs up. That is how reverse swing came into play and if one looks at the Test matches in last two years, conventional swing is taking over reverse in red ball format.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rule 3: Incoming Batter Ready to Face the Ball

An incoming batter will now be required to be ready to take strike within two minutes in Tests and ODIs, while the current threshold of ninety seconds in T20Is remains unchanged.

Implications: This is done to avoid deliberate time wasting tactics, especially in close Test matches on the fifth day, when a team batting in the fourth innings during final stages tries to delay proceedings.

Rule 4: Striker's Right to Play the Ball

This is restricted so as to require some part of their bat or person to remain within the pitch. Should they venture beyond that, the umpire will call and signal dead ball. Any ball which would force the batter to leave the pitch will also be called no ball.

Implications: There is no such significance as this is very, very rare at the highest level.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rule 5: Unfair Movement by the Fielding Side

Any unfair and deliberate movement while the bowler is running in to bowl could now result in the umpire awarding five penalty runs to the batting side, in addition to it being called a dead ball.

Implications: Fielders normally back up and cover some ground, but that would now be deemed unfair if it happens before the delivery is completed. Some quick singles inside the circle, that used to be saved, might not be otherwise.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rule 6: Running Out of The Non-Striker

The playing conditions follow the laws in moving this method of effecting a run out from the 'unfair play' section to the 'run out' section.

Implication: The rule has always been in place, but it is the bowler who has got the stick from the cricket community as the Australians and English saw it as going against the spirit of cricket. Bowlers have been judged over the years for what is deemed legal in letter but not in spirit. It will change now.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rule 7: Bowler Throwing Towards Striker's End Before Delivery

Previously, a bowler who saw the batter advancing down the wicket before entering their delivery stride, could throw the ball in an attempt to run out the striker. This practice will now be called a dead ball.

Implication: Nothing much as most bowlers aren't seen using this ploy. Especially fast bowlers are in motion, and even if they find a batter giving charge while loading up, it's difficult to pull out of the action as it could cause injuries.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rule 8: Consequences of Slow Over Rate

The in-match penalty introduced in T20Is in January 2022 (whereby the failure of a fielding team to bowl their overs by the scheduled cessation time leads to an additional fielder having to be brought inside the fielding circle for the remaining overs of the innings), will also be adopted in ODI matches after the completion of the ICC Men's World Cup Super League in 2023.

Implication: The teams are now taking nearly four hours at times to complete the 50 overs knowing that only a token financial penalty is in place, and that too, paid by the boards. This rule would mean that one less fielder outside the 30-yard circle in last two or three overs could massively impact the game. Especially for sides defending.

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

Read and Breaking News at the Quint, browse for more from sports and cricket

Topics:  New ICC Rules 

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