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US Issues 'Worldwide Caution' After al-Qaeda Chief Ayman al-Zawahiri's Killing

Ayman al-Zawahiri had overseen the 9/11 attacks in 2001 along with Osama bin-Laden.

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World
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US Issues 'Worldwide Caution' After al-Qaeda Chief Ayman al-Zawahiri's Killing
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Three days after the killing of al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, the United States has issued a 'Worldwide Caution' for its citizens. The US State Department, in a statement issued on Wednesday, 3 August, said that supporters of al-Qaeda, or its affiliated terrorist organisations, may seek to attack US facilities, personnel, or citizens.

"As terrorist attacks often occur without warning, US citizens are strongly encouraged to maintain a high level of vigilance and practise good situational awareness when traveling abroad," it said.

"US citizens abroad are urged to monitor the local news and maintain contact with the nearest US Embassy or Consulate," the State Department added.

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Ayman al-Zawahiri's Death

Ayman al-Zawahiri had overseen the 9/11 attacks in 2001 – which had killed 2,977 people – along with Osama bin-Laden, who was killed by the US in 2011 in Pakistan.

He was killed in a drone strike carried out by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) last week, at a house in Kabul where he was sheltering.

US President Joe Biden, in his address, stated that al-Zawahiri's death would bring "closure" to families of the thousands of people killed during the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks.

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Edited By :Saundarya Talwar
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