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Putting Lemon Juice in Nose Can’t Cure COVID-19, Claim is False

Doctors said that putting lemon drops in the nose will not cure COVID-19 and that it can adversely impact people.

Published
WebQoof
3 min read
Fact-Check | Putting lemon juice in the nose will not cure one of COVID-19. The practice is dangerous and could have serious side effects. 
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While the country is reeling under the second and deadlier wave of COVID-19, misinformation and false claims around alleged cures of the disease are also going viral.

One such claim going massively viral on different social platform claims that putting two drops of lemon juice in the nose will cure one of COVID-19.

We spoke with several doctors and they dismissed the claim. There are no studies or any research paper to back this claim either.

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CLAIM

The video that is going viral shows a person claiming that the 'lemon therapy' can not only boost immunity in a person but also save them from the novel coronavirus. He advises people to put two drops of lemon juice in their nostrils and says that it will cure one of COVID-19 in just five seconds.

"This will also provide relief to those who are facing all cold and cough illnesses," the man says.

A similar claim was also suggested as a means to "increase" oxygen levels in COVID-19 patients by BJP leader and former MP from Karnataka Vijay Sankeshwar.

As per news reports, a police complaint has been filed against the ex-MP when a teacher from Karnataka's Raichur died after allegedly self-administering lime juice through his nostrils.(An archive of the post can be found here.)(Source: Facebook/Screenshot)

<div class="paragraphs"><p>(An archive of the post can be found <a href="https://perma.cc/9JEM-T2WN">here</a>.)</p></div>

(An archive of the post can be found here.)

(Source: Facebook/Screenshot)

The archives of other Facebook and Twitter posts can be found here, here and here.

The viral video was also sent to us on our WhatsApp tipline.

WHAT WE FOUND OUT

We reached out to Dr Vikas Maurya, Director and HOD, Pulmonology, Fortis Hospital Shalimar Bagh.

Dr Maurya dismissed the claim and said that the putting lemon drops in the nose will not cure one of COVID-19.

“No, there is no such thing. You need to be very careful if you think you have symptoms. The first thing is isolate yourself and then get tested. Connect with a doctor if you test positive and get treated according to what he/she suggests. By putting lemon drops in your nasal passage you will not get rid of corona. The only thing that you can do to prevent getting COVID-19 is sanitise, wear your mask and keep social distancing.”
Dr Vikas Maurya, Director and HOD, Pulmonology, Fortis Hospital Shalimar Bagh

We couldn't find any research paper on treating COVID-19 by putting lemon drops in the nose. In 2020, The Quint had debunked a claim that said that having lemon and ginger can cure one of COVID-19.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has also stated that there is no proof that lemon can cure coronavirus.

“There is no scientific evidence that lemon/turmeric prevents COVID-19. In general, however, WHO recommends consuming adequate fruit and vegetables as part of a healthy diet,” the WHO has said.
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We also spoke with an Ayurvedic doctor, Dr Anirudh Mohite, Co-founder of Ayurveda Growth at NirogStreet. Dr Mohite, too, dismissed the claim and said that putting lemon juice in a sensitive area like the inside of the nose could do more harm than good.

“There is no mention of treating a disease by putting lemon juice in the nose anywhere in Ayurveda. The inside of the nose is very sensitive and in this case, putting lemon juice in the nose can also cause ulcer problems, because lemon contains citric acid.”
Dr Anirudh Mohite, Co-founder of Ayurveda Growth at NirogStreet

The Quint has previously debunked a similar viral claim that said that COVID-19 gets cured by putting mustard oil in the nose and ears.

The claim that COVID-19 can be cured by putting lemon juice in the nostrils is false. People should follow COVID-appropriate behaviour to avoid getting infected and if one starts showing symptoms, they should immediately isolate themselves and reach out to a doctor for advice. Self-medicating could lead to harmful side effects.

(This story has been published as a part of The Quint’s COVID-19 fact-check project targeting rural women. It was flagged to us by our partner organisation Video Volunteers.)

(This story was first published on FIT and has been republished with permission.)

(Not convinced of a post or information you came across online and want it verified? Send us the details on WhatsApp at 9643651818, or e-mail it to us at webqoof@thequint.com and we'll fact-check it for you. You can also read all our fact-checked stories here.)

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

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