ADVERTISEMENT

Will Allow Women in National Defence Academy: Centre Tells Supreme Court

The Supreme Court was hearing a petition against women being denied opportunities to be part of the NDA.

Updated
India
2 min read
<div class="paragraphs"><p>The Government of India will allow women in the National Defence Academy (NDA), the Centre told the Supreme Court</p></div>
i

The Centre on Wednesday, 8 September, told the Supreme Court that it will allow women in the National Defence Academy (NDA).

"I am delighted to share this. Girls will be admitted to NDA. We will place a detailed affidavit," ASG Bhati told the court, as quoted by Bar&Bench (B&B).

The government's stand came while the apex court was hearing a petition by Delhi-based lawyer Kush Kalra against women being denied opportunities to be part of the NDA.

The petition was filed on the basis of violation of fundamental rights of women.

Appreciating the Centre's stand, the court, as quoted by B&B said: "The armed forces are a respected branch in the country but for gender equality they needs to do more. We are happy with the stand."

The court in its order also appreciated the ASG for persuading the armed services to take a more gender-balancing approach.

The court will hear the matter on 22 September.

What the Petition Said

The Public Interest Litigation (PIL) by Kalra said that the exclusion of eligible female candidates from entering the NDA is "not constitutionally justifiable and is simply done on the basis of their sex".

It also alleged that denying equal opportunity to women to join the NDA “should not be used to perpetuate and continue the legal, social, and economic inferiority of women”.

After hearing the petition on 30 July, former CJI SA Bobde had issued a notice to the Centre in this regard.

ADVERTISEMENT

How do Women Currently Join the Defence Forces?

The Army, Air Force and Navy began inducting women as short-service commission (SSC) officers in 1992 and can join the forces only by appearing for the SSC after graduation unlike male officers.

They then need to complete 10 months to one year of training required before being commissioned as officers.

(With inputs from Bar&Bench.)

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

ADVERTISEMENT
Published: 
ADVERTISEMENT
Stay Updated

Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter And Get News Delivered Straight To Your Inbox.

Join over 120,000 subscribers!
ADVERTISEMENT