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Explained: What Is ‘Moye Moye’, the Trend That Has Taken the Internet by Storm?

The words 'Moye Moye' have originated from a Serbian song called 'Džanum'.

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The 'Moye Moye' trend is the internet's latest obsession. Originating from a Serbian song that first went viral on TikTok, the catchy tune has now led to countless memes, parodies and reels, and has even given birth to its own dance craze.

But what does 'Moye Moye' mean, and where exactly does it come from? Here's all you need to know:

Explained: What Is ‘Moye Moye’, the Trend That Has Taken the Internet by Storm?

  1. 1. What is 'Moye Moye'?

    The tune 'Moye Moye' comes from the chorus of Serbian singer-songwriter Teya Dora’s 2023 song ‘Džanum’, which now has over 60 million views on YouTube.

    It is important to note that the words originally used in the song are 'Moje More' (pronounced as 'moye more'), which the internet has mistaken for 'Moye Moye'.

    In Serbian, the words 'Moje More' mean 'my nightmares', that have been repeatedly used in the chorus.

    Unlike the viral comedy reels, Dora's 3-minute-long song is about the expression of longing, pain and rejection, with the narrator feeling trapped and unloved. The repetition of 'More' emphasises her despair and her dreams of a better life as she believes her fate is cursed.

    Take a look at the original music video here:

    Following the enormous success of her song, Dora also took to Threads to thank her fans. She wrote, "Thank you for appreciating the music. It’s wonderful to see Serbian music spreading all over the world. Every day, I receive love from all across the world. I love you.”

    Expand
  2. 2. How Did the Song Become a Viral Meme?

    The song's virality can be attributed to its catchy melody and simple lyrics, which make it easy for anybody to lip-sync in their short videos. This could potentially be one of the reasons why the song has been dominating TikTok and Instagram charts, with millions of users incorporating the tune in their reels and posts.

    On Instagram, over 1.3 million reels have been made using Džanum and on TikTok, the song has been used in 302.8 thousand videos.

    Meanwhile, South Asian social media users have repurposed the song by incorporating a touch of 'dark humour' into viral videos, unlike the song's actual intention and message.

    For instance, in the reel below, a man offers tea to his friends in a steel container. When his friends complain that it's not in a cup, the man says, "Because Australia took the cup home."

    For the unversed, the reference used in the reel is for the 2023 ICC World Cup Final between India and Australia, where Australia won the match by six wickets.

    Have a look:

    But this isn't it. From social media influencers to Bollywood actor Ayushmann Khurrana to the Delhi Police, almost everyone has hopped on to the trend.

    On 24 November, the Delhi Police used the ‘Moye Moye’ tune in their video to talk about road safety on X.

    Have a look at their video here:

    Ayushmann also gave his own twist to the trend. The actor started singing 'Moye Moye' during one of his concerts. A clip of the same went viral.

    Have a look:

    (At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

    Expand

What is 'Moye Moye'?

The tune 'Moye Moye' comes from the chorus of Serbian singer-songwriter Teya Dora’s 2023 song ‘Džanum’, which now has over 60 million views on YouTube.

It is important to note that the words originally used in the song are 'Moje More' (pronounced as 'moye more'), which the internet has mistaken for 'Moye Moye'.

In Serbian, the words 'Moje More' mean 'my nightmares', that have been repeatedly used in the chorus.

Unlike the viral comedy reels, Dora's 3-minute-long song is about the expression of longing, pain and rejection, with the narrator feeling trapped and unloved. The repetition of 'More' emphasises her despair and her dreams of a better life as she believes her fate is cursed.

Take a look at the original music video here:

Following the enormous success of her song, Dora also took to Threads to thank her fans. She wrote, "Thank you for appreciating the music. It’s wonderful to see Serbian music spreading all over the world. Every day, I receive love from all across the world. I love you.”

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How Did the Song Become a Viral Meme?

The song's virality can be attributed to its catchy melody and simple lyrics, which make it easy for anybody to lip-sync in their short videos. This could potentially be one of the reasons why the song has been dominating TikTok and Instagram charts, with millions of users incorporating the tune in their reels and posts.

On Instagram, over 1.3 million reels have been made using Džanum and on TikTok, the song has been used in 302.8 thousand videos.

Meanwhile, South Asian social media users have repurposed the song by incorporating a touch of 'dark humour' into viral videos, unlike the song's actual intention and message.

For instance, in the reel below, a man offers tea to his friends in a steel container. When his friends complain that it's not in a cup, the man says, "Because Australia took the cup home."

For the unversed, the reference used in the reel is for the 2023 ICC World Cup Final between India and Australia, where Australia won the match by six wickets.

Have a look:

But this isn't it. From social media influencers to Bollywood actor Ayushmann Khurrana to the Delhi Police, almost everyone has hopped on to the trend.

On 24 November, the Delhi Police used the ‘Moye Moye’ tune in their video to talk about road safety on X.

Have a look at their video here:

Ayushmann also gave his own twist to the trend. The actor started singing 'Moye Moye' during one of his concerts. A clip of the same went viral.

Have a look:

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

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