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'Eternally Confused and Eager for Love' Review: Light, Fun But Middling Show
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'Eternally Confused and Eager for Love' Review: Light, Fun But Middling Show

Our review of Eternally Confused and Eager for Love now streaming on Netflix

Published
Movie Reviews
4 min read

'Eternally Confused and Eager for Love' Review: Light, Fun But Middling Show

In the John Green universe, or where characters of Euphoria come from, is a land of young adults and teenagers that mostly goes unnoticed by anyone in their big three zero’s. Eternally Confused and Eager for Love is like The Perks of Being a Wall Flower meets Sex Education. Add to it all the awkward teenage love and sex stories like Juno, where we deal with body image issues, childhood traumas, insecurities and negative self talk in which we indulge in frequently and more. Emily in Paris and Little Things are recent examples and Freaky Friday, Lizzie McGuire and all other Hilary Duff, Lindsay Lohan and the Olsen twin movies and shows from the 2000’s is basically what we have here - young people in urban cities across the world, struggling with identity, sexuality, personality and every other aspect of being that one can think of.

Light, fun, all about sex and romance, this is an easy, fluffy and light show about a young, well-to-do boy in Mumbai and his coming of age and more or less, having sex.

Ray, a rich boy from urban Mumbai (what resembles town) lives in a large and beautiful house, dines regularly at delicious restaurants and works a job in which he has little to no interest. He studied in America and now, back in India, lives with his parents, who’s only source of joy seems to be finding their virginal, awkward son a chance to get laid. His co-worker and only close male friend is douche bro stereotype - loud, obnoxious, dumb jock vibe with a special skill with the ladies. His other friend and confidant, his childhood best friend, Riya, is always kind, patient and ready with a smile. She is the picture of dignity and upper class show horse breeding (much like everyone else in the show). Ray, then, has to navigate the waters of online dating, blind dates, an awkward lack of charisma and an incessant imaginary friend in the form of an action figure with whom he has a constant dialogue, riddled with American cultural references, innuendos and more. This action figure is probably the second lead of the show and in the voice of Jim Sarbh, it is quite a treat.

A still from Eternally Confused and Eager for Love.

(Photo Courtesy: Netflix)

A slice of life, coming of age fluffy show written and directed by Rahul Nair is going to attract lots of bitter feedback, words like “meaningless” and “real India” will do the rounds, where bitter people will shake their heads and fists at their TV or laptop screens because characters aren’t starring in poverty porn or hinterland crime dramas - because according to some, there really is only one India, isn’t there?
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I suppose urban India can then go take a hike. For those who will hear this, ignore it. It carries no merit and is an age old problem for Indian audiences who seem to want to ignore how diverse this country really is. A rich character on Indian TV - how dare they! Moving on then, all this nonsense aside, the problem is that for a fun premise such as this one, there just isn’t enough material for the show to be engaging. While it keeps a smile on your face for the most part and the direction, dialogues, set design and more are well done and beautifully crafted, the show doesn’t have enough material to remain interesting or engaging throughout its fairly long run.

Eternally Confused and Eager for Love also starts to feel very easy, problems are set up and resolved very easily. There is no depth to the issues, even for a slice of life easy breezy show, the issues and conflicts are far too easily introduced and resolved.

A still from Eternally Confused and Eager for Love.

(Photo Courtesy: Netflix)

While the acting, direction and screenplay remain tight, the story is too thin, too spindly to hold it together. It is though, an idea, that is for all the awkward teenage boys out there (and there are many of those, I can vouch for that) who hide behind humour or shy smiles, this ones for them. Finally, a hero they can relate to and they can love like a brother. The pimples, the barely growing facial hair, the lack of skills in speaking to women and more. It has it all. Don’t we all know boys like these, whether they’re eighteen or twenty five and sometimes even forty.

Romantic comedies and slice of life stories usually have women at the centre and fall under the chick flick genre, which women sit together and watch in their pajamas, bingeing on vanilla ice cream, salted caramel popcorn and doing their nails, but for once, we have a weekend binge for young men, their own guilty pleasure. A light, easy watch but hardly engaging, this one is neither here nor there.

Rating: 2.5 Out of 5

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