Molasses Leak: Water is Life But in Punjab It’s Poison  

Mollases leak from Chadha Sugar Mils has turned the waters brownish-red.

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Recently, a large number of fish were found floating dead in the Beas and Satluj rivers due to a molasses leak from a nearby sugar factory. The leak eventually led to the waters turning brownish-red.

The molasses have leaked into a creek which merges into the Beas. After the leak, the molasses have turned the water brownish-red. The first guess is that the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD)of the water increasing has lowered the availability of oxygen for the fish. That could have led to some fish dying.
Kamaldeep Singh Sangha, Deputy Commissioner, Amritsar

The Punjab Pollution Control Board has issued a notice to Chadha sugar mill over molasses leakage and has sought a reply on why action should not be taken for the alleged violations.

We have tied up with the World Bank to clean up the water and it’s a huge project. The main reason is industrial pollution and because of that our sewage treatment plants are getting affected since the water has turned acidic. The Pollution Control Board is initiating the creation of Common Effluent Treatment Plants. One out of four has been constructed so far. The rest will be made in time since some are under the state government and others under the central government. The factories that don’t follow affluent treatment guidelines are the ones that can be penalised and suspended or closed down.
Pradeep Gupta, Expert, Pollution Control Board

After drawing flak from Shiromani Akali Dal and Aam Aadmi Party for not taking action against owners of Chadha Sugar Mill, Chief Minister Amarinder Singh has warned against laxity in dumping of molasses into the river and has sought a report on the inquiry into the matter.

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