Apple Watch Series 4 Gets ECG Tracking via Watch OS 5.1.2 Update
Apple Watch Series 4 getting a new update this week.
Apple Watch Series 4 getting a new update this week.(Photo: Apple)

Apple Watch Series 4 Gets ECG Tracking via Watch OS 5.1.2 Update

Apple Watch Series 4 will now help users in the US take an electrocardiogram (ECG) right from their wrist, capturing heart rhythm in a moment when they experience symptoms like a rapid or skipped heart beat and helping to provide critical data to physicians.

"Starting today, the ECG app on Apple Watch Series 4 marks the first direct-to-consumer product that enables customers to take an electrocardiogram right from their wrist," added the Cupertino-based tech giant.

The irregular rhythm notification feature on Apple Watch can now occasionally check heart rhythms in the background and send a notification if an irregular heart rhythm that appears to be atrial fibrillation (AFib) is identified.

Also Read : Apple’s New ECG App Won’t Replace an ECG Device, or a Doctor

When left untreated, AFib is one of the leading conditions that can result in stroke, the second most common cause of death around the world.

Apple worked with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for several years to receive "De Novo" classification for the ECG app and the irregular heart rhythm notification.

Both the features are now available as part of a free update to watchOS 5.1.2.

This is How it Works.

To take an ECG recording at any time or following an irregular rhythm notification, open the new ECG app and hold your finger on the Digital Crown.

The new Apple Watch Series 4 is coming later this year. 
The new Apple Watch Series 4 is coming later this year. 
(Photo: Apple)

As you touch the Digital Crown, the circuit is completed and electrical signals across their heart are measured.

Also Read : Apple Watch Series 4 Comes With New Electric Heart Rate Sensor

"After 30 seconds, the heart rhythm is classified as either AFib, sinus rhythm or inconclusive. All recordings, their associated classifications and any noted symptoms are stored securely in the Health app on iPhone. Users can share a PDF of the results with physicians," Apple informed.

All recordings, their associated classifications and any noted symptoms are stored securely in the Health app on iPhone, said Apple.

The ECG app's ability to accurately classify an ECG recording into AFib and sinus rhythm was validated in a clinical trial of around 600 participants.

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