India is looking to shift to eco-friendly cars to control emissions and reduce dependence on imported oil. 
India is looking to shift to eco-friendly cars to control emissions and reduce dependence on imported oil. (Photo: Reuters)
  • 1. What is Bharat Stage VI?
  • 2. Impact of Bharat Stage VI on Price of Cars
  • 3. What About Resale Value of BS-IV Cars?
  • 4. Should You Wait for Discounts on BS-IV Cars?
  • 5. What Technical Differences Will BS-VI Vehicles Have?
  • 6. How Much Longer Can You Drive Your Old Cars?
Should You Buy a BS-IV Compliant Car Now or Wait For a BS-VI One?

From 1 April 2020, only cars that comply with Bharat Stage VI emissions norms can be sold in India. With a little over a year to go before that deadline automakers are scrambling to bring in new technologies to meet BS-VI emission norms. Right now, India’s emission norms are Bharat Stage IV (BS-IV), which is equivalent to Euro 4 emission norms.

Along with the emission norms change (skipping BS-V and going directly to BS-VI), India is also enacting new crash-test safety norms (BNCAP) in October 2019.

So that brings up the question: Should you be looking to buy a BS-IV compliant car right now, or wait a year and pick up one that meets BS-VI emission norms? Here is all you need to know about these emission norms.

  • 1. What is Bharat Stage VI?

    India will soon be at a par with Europe when it comes to emissions standards, when it adopts Bharat Stage VI. The country is taking this step, skipping from BS-IV to BS-VI, because India is a signatory to the Paris Climate Agreement, signed in October 2016.

    Under Bharat Stage VI, cars, especially diesel cars will have to undergo significant changes to the engine to conform to the norms. Delhi already has Bharat Stage VI fuel on sale, in which the sulphur content of diesel is less than 10 mg/Kg, compared to 50 mg/Kg under Bharat Stage IV norms.

    Reducing the sulphur content in fuel will directly reduce the particulate matter emissions (PM 10 and PM 2.5) of diesel vehicles. Sulphur is a by product of the fuel refining process.

    India is looking to shift to eco-friendly cars to control emissions and reduce dependence on imported oil. 
    Photo: The Quint

    Under the Bharat Stage VI norms the emissions requirements for petrol and diesel cars are almost at par. Diesel vehicles emit far less carbon di-oxide and hydrocarbons than petrol, while petrol cars emit less nitrous oxides and next to negligible particulate matter.

    India is looking to shift to eco-friendly cars to control emissions and reduce dependence on imported oil. 
    Photo: The Quint
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