Explained: BCCI Bosses’ ‘Lifeline’, AGM & Domestic Cricket Plans

BCCI President Sourav Ganguly and Jay Shah remain at the BCCI despite the end of their tenures.

Updated
Cricket
4 min read
BCCI President Sourav Ganguly and Jay Shah remain at the BCCI despite the end of their tenures.
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Snapshot

By 27 July 2020, BCCI President Sourav Ganguly and Secretary Jay Shah had both reached the end of their tenure with the Board. And, as per the BCCI constitution they were voted to help uphold, they needed to go into a mandatory three year ‘cooling off’ period. 

However, four and a half months have passed, but the two – and the many other elected members who have since also reached the end of their tenures – continue to run India’s cricket body.

So, why is this the case and till when is this status quo going to continue and what does this mean for Indian cricket, and more importantly, India’s domestic cricket?

The Quint explains:

Explained: BCCI Bosses’ ‘Lifeline’, AGM & Domestic Cricket Plans

  1. 1. BCCI Bosses: What's The Update?

    According to the new BCCI constitution, an elected official can hold a post in the Board and/or any of its affiliate state cricket associations for a total of six years. After that, they must step away from cricket administration for a total of three years.

    Board president Ganguly, secretary Shah and joint secretary Jayesh George have all finished their cumulative six years but they continue to run the board.

    Why? Because the BCCI’s application with the Supreme Court seeking an amendment to this clause (and many others) in its constitution, means that the officials can continue on, till the apex court takes a final call.

    And to this long process, there was an update on 9 December, when in the case hearing, the Supreme Court made decisions on other matters but ordered this case to be listed in the third week of January.

    Meaning, the BCCI top brass can continue on till 2021.

    Expand
  2. 2. What Does it Mean for Indian Cricket?

    While the many clauses in the BCCI’s constitution may dictate that the top brass of the Board need to step down, there is a bigger question of ‘what next’ to be answered if indeed Ganguly and Shah vacate their posts.

    The obvious answer is that there will be another election. But are these officials in the state bodies, who could take charge of the richest cricket board in the world, capable enough to continue the work the Ganguly-Shah duo have put together?

    An IPL in the middle of a pandemic was no small feat, having to move the tournament to another country – pulling it off without many hitches.

    Also, it is important to remember that the last BCCI election took place after there was an administrative vacuum in the Board for over two-and-a-half years, with the court-appointed CoA running the show.

    With very little changing in the way of state administrators’ acceptance of the Lodha Committee reforms, a certainty of an election is not 100 percent.

    Expand
  3. 3. BCCI AGM on 24 December

    With the Supreme Court giving the current Board officials another three weeks (at least) in office, it means Ganguly will once again be at the head of the table when the BCCI’s Annual General Meeting convenes on 24 December.

    And, among the biggest topics of discussion from the meeting will be the addition of two new teams to the IPL. Yes, a 10-team IPL in 2021 if the voting state cricket associations approve of it.

    Reports suggest the Adani Group and Sanjeev Goenka's RPG, who owned Rising Pune Supergiants, are the two front-runners to buy teams with one most likely to be based in Ahmedabad.

    Apart from this, there are 22 other points on the agenda that secretary Shah mailed to all state associations earlier this month.

    The AGM will also decide on the Board’s representative to the ICC and the Asian Cricket Council with Shah likely to be put forward for both.

    Expand
  4. 4. Domestic Cricket

    On 14 October 2019, days before being elected unopposed as BCCI president, Ganguly said 'my biggest priority will be to look after first-class cricketers'.

    One year and a worldwide pandemic later, the only cricket that has been organised by the BCCI, in this calendar year, has been a truncated tour of South Africa and the IPL.

    While the IPL was the Board’s priority, there are many other cricketing commodities in the Indian ecosystem that have not received their due. Like domestic cricket or even women’s cricket.

    Yes, there was a small three-team ‘tournament’ organised by the BCCI for women cricketers, but in the year of the World Cup and the success that the Indian women’s team saw, a follow-up event is the least they deserve.

    And what of the Ranji Trophy? According to reports, state associations are more keen on playing the Syed Mushtaq Ali T20 tournament this season, ahead of the Ranji.

    Sides like Karnataka, Saurashtra and Punjab are reported to be among six states who have written to the Board to request for the T20 tournament, to kick-off the much delayed season in January.

    The Board had asked the state units for their opinion earlier this month and it seems like just the two formats will be played this season, with the Ranji taking place closer to the summer.

    However, a formal announcement from the BCCI is *much* awaited.

    (The Quint is available on Telegram. For handpicked stories every day, subscribe to us on Telegram)

    Expand

BCCI Bosses: What's The Update?

According to the new BCCI constitution, an elected official can hold a post in the Board and/or any of its affiliate state cricket associations for a total of six years. After that, they must step away from cricket administration for a total of three years.

Board president Ganguly, secretary Shah and joint secretary Jayesh George have all finished their cumulative six years but they continue to run the board.

Why? Because the BCCI’s application with the Supreme Court seeking an amendment to this clause (and many others) in its constitution, means that the officials can continue on, till the apex court takes a final call.

And to this long process, there was an update on 9 December, when in the case hearing, the Supreme Court made decisions on other matters but ordered this case to be listed in the third week of January.

Meaning, the BCCI top brass can continue on till 2021.

What Does it Mean for Indian Cricket?

While the many clauses in the BCCI’s constitution may dictate that the top brass of the Board need to step down, there is a bigger question of ‘what next’ to be answered if indeed Ganguly and Shah vacate their posts.

The obvious answer is that there will be another election. But are these officials in the state bodies, who could take charge of the richest cricket board in the world, capable enough to continue the work the Ganguly-Shah duo have put together?

An IPL in the middle of a pandemic was no small feat, having to move the tournament to another country – pulling it off without many hitches.

Also, it is important to remember that the last BCCI election took place after there was an administrative vacuum in the Board for over two-and-a-half years, with the court-appointed CoA running the show.

With very little changing in the way of state administrators’ acceptance of the Lodha Committee reforms, a certainty of an election is not 100 percent.

BCCI AGM on 24 December

With the Supreme Court giving the current Board officials another three weeks (at least) in office, it means Ganguly will once again be at the head of the table when the BCCI’s Annual General Meeting convenes on 24 December.

And, among the biggest topics of discussion from the meeting will be the addition of two new teams to the IPL. Yes, a 10-team IPL in 2021 if the voting state cricket associations approve of it.

Reports suggest the Adani Group and Sanjeev Goenka's RPG, who owned Rising Pune Supergiants, are the two front-runners to buy teams with one most likely to be based in Ahmedabad.

Apart from this, there are 22 other points on the agenda that secretary Shah mailed to all state associations earlier this month.

The AGM will also decide on the Board’s representative to the ICC and the Asian Cricket Council with Shah likely to be put forward for both.

Domestic Cricket

On 14 October 2019, days before being elected unopposed as BCCI president, Ganguly said 'my biggest priority will be to look after first-class cricketers'.

One year and a worldwide pandemic later, the only cricket that has been organised by the BCCI, in this calendar year, has been a truncated tour of South Africa and the IPL.

While the IPL was the Board’s priority, there are many other cricketing commodities in the Indian ecosystem that have not received their due. Like domestic cricket or even women’s cricket.

Yes, there was a small three-team ‘tournament’ organised by the BCCI for women cricketers, but in the year of the World Cup and the success that the Indian women’s team saw, a follow-up event is the least they deserve.

And what of the Ranji Trophy? According to reports, state associations are more keen on playing the Syed Mushtaq Ali T20 tournament this season, ahead of the Ranji.

Sides like Karnataka, Saurashtra and Punjab are reported to be among six states who have written to the Board to request for the T20 tournament, to kick-off the much delayed season in January.

The Board had asked the state units for their opinion earlier this month and it seems like just the two formats will be played this season, with the Ranji taking place closer to the summer.

However, a formal announcement from the BCCI is *much* awaited.

(The Quint is available on Telegram. For handpicked stories every day, subscribe to us on Telegram)

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