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Why Govt's Intent To Be Super Censor is a Red Flag for Filmmaking

Why does the government want re-examination powers if the CBFC is already reviewing films?

Updated
Podcast
1 min read

The Cinematograph (Amendment) Bill 2021 is stirring up the film fraternity in India. Among other things, it seeks to empower the government to sidestep the Central Board of Film Certification and become a "super censor" that can re-examine film certifications if there are any complaints against them, even after they have already been passed by the CBFC.


The government released the draft Bill on 18 June into the public domain with this new contentious provision, and a few other proposals on age reclassification for viewers and film piracy. The general public has been given two weeks' time till Friday, 2 July, to submit their comments.

A group of people have already shot off a letter to the government saying that “the amendments giving powers to the central government to revoke a film certificate must be dropped". Celebrities like Kamal Hassan and Vishal Bhardwaj have also vocally criticised the move on social media platforms and urged people to raise their voices against it.


But why does the government want to be the super censor? What is the intention behind this move? And what do people from the film industry have to say about it?

Our guests in this episode are: Filmmaker, producer, and screenwriter Sanjay Gupta, who is known for his hit films like Kaante, Shootout at Lokhandwala, Mayank Tewari, who's co-written critically acclaimed films and shows like Newton, Bard of Blood, and Sulemeni Keeda, and Karan Tripathi, Legal Consultant at The Quint. Tune in!

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

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