Maldives Denies Reports Calling For Indian Military Intervention

Maldives reiterated that at no time did they ask for any foreign military intervention.

Published
World
2 min read
Indian troops, which are being led by a unit of the Army’s special forces, remain on standby at an IAF airbase.
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Amid the ongoing crisis in the nation, the Maldives Defence Ministry on Tuesday, 13 February, raised concerns over multiple reports saying that the country was encouraging Indian military’s intervention to resolve the emergency.

In a statement, the Maldives government called on all parites — Indian media, politicians and local media — to refrain from such calls, which constitute a threat to the nation’s independence and national security.

The government views such actions irresponsible and intended to cause the citizens of both nations, as well as other stakeholders, to cast doubt upon the excellent relationship India and Maldives have enjoyed for decades. The government therefore calls on all parties to refrain from such calls.
Ministry of Defence and National Security of Maldives

Furthermore, Maldives reiterated in the press note that it has maintained good relations with India since the emergency was declared and firmly believes that India would not act on such calls.

The Quint had reported on 6 February, a day after the 15-day emergency was declared in the Maldives by President Abdulla Yameen, that the Indian troops, which are being led by a unit of the army’s special forces, remain on standby at the Indian Air Force’s Yelahanka airbase.

The Maldives Defence Ministry note further reiterated that there is no threat to the Maldives from being invaded by foreign military.

We would like to further reiterate that at no time has the government of Maldives requested any foreign country for military intervention or assistance.
Ministry of Defence and National Security of Maldives
Maldives Denies Reports Calling For Indian Military Intervention
(Photo Courtesy: Maldives Defence Ministry)

The Maldives has been in crisis since last month, when the Supreme Court quashed convictions ranging from corruption to terrorism against nine opposition figures, including former president Mohamed Nasheed, its first democratically elected leader.

Tension rose when President Yameen's government rejected the ruling, imposed the emergency for 15 days on 5 February and then arrested the chief justice and another judge of the court.

Maldives ex-president Nasheed had called for India to send an envoy backed by its military to free Supreme Court judges and other detainees.

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