2016 Video Shared as Boycott of French Goods By Arab Countries

The viral video is from Saudi Arabia and shows authorities dumping several packs of expired chicken.

Published
WebQoof
3 min read
The viral video is from Saudi Arabia and shows authorities dumping several packs of expired chicken.
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A video showing people dumping packets out of trucks in the middle of a desert has gone viral with the claim that it shows how Arab countries are dumping French products.

However, we found that the video in question was an old one from 2016 and showed authorities dumping around 80,000 packets of expired chicken which was not fit for human consumption.

CLAIM

The viral clip was captioned, “फ्रांस के सामान का बायकॉट, अरब देशों में कुछ इस तरह हो रहा है, ये सब देख कर, फ़्रांस जल्द ही पागल होने वाला है।” [Traslation: This is how Arab contries are boycotting French products, France is going to go crazy soon after seeing this.]

An archive of the post can be found <a href="https://archive.is/WYOiz">here</a>.&nbsp;
An archive of the post can be found here
(Photo: Screenshot/Twitter)
This clip comes amid widescale protests against French President Emmanuel Macron over his statements about Islam and Prophet Mohammed following the beheading of a french teacher in Paris on 16 October 2020.

Macron made a statement in which he vowed not to “give up cartoons” depicting the Prophet Mohammed citing freedom of speech. Macron had to face a lot of criticism for his statement, and several Muslim-majority countries called for a boycott of French goods.

An archive of the post can be found <a href="https://archive.is/Bv7VZ">here</a>.&nbsp;
An archive of the post can be found here
(Photo: Screenshot/Twitter)

The video was also shared widely on Facebook with similar captions.

The link to the search can be found <a href="https://www.facebook.com/search/videos/?q=%E0%A4%AB%E0%A5%8D%E0%A4%B0%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%82%E0%A4%B8%20%E0%A4%95%E0%A5%87%20%E0%A4%B8%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%AE%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%A8%20%E0%A4%95%E0%A4%BE%20%E0%A4%AC%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%AF%E0%A4%95%E0%A5%89%E0%A4%9F">here</a>.&nbsp;
The link to the search can be found here
(Photo: Screenshot/Facebook)
An archive of the post can be found <a href="https://archive.is/sip6t">here</a>.&nbsp;
An archive of the post can be found here
(Photo: Screenshot/Facebook)
An archive of the post can be found <a href="https://archive.is/aoVDX">here</a>.&nbsp;
An archive of the post can be found here
(Photo: Screenshot/Facebook)

WHAT WE FOUND OUT

We broke down the video using InVid Google Chrome extension and conducted a reverse image search.

While going through the search results, we came across a news report from 17 November 2016 published on Al Arabiya news, titled “Video shows Saudi Arabia getting rid of 80,000 packs of ‘spoiled chicken’”. The report had a screengrab from the same viral video.

An archive of the post can be found <a href="https://archive.is/CloHq">here</a>.&nbsp;
An archive of the post can be found here
(Photo: Screenshot/Al Arabiya)

The report added that “these packs of expired chicken were confiscated inside 25 refrigerated trucks prior to their distribution inside and outside al-Qassim district.”

We also found a video in the story that had a longer clip of the incident. The video was posted on 16 November 2016.

The story was also published in Al Riyadh newspaper.

An archive of the post can be found <a href="https://archive.is/0lim6">here</a>.&nbsp;
An archive of the post can be found here
(Photo: Screenshot/Al Riyadh)

Evidently, an old and unrelated video was used to claim that it is part of the recent protests against France. We have debunked several other stories with incorrect information about the protests in France which can be found here.

(Not convinced of a post or information you came across online and want it verified? Send us the details on WhatsApp at 9643651818, or e-mail it to us at webqoof@thequint.com and we'll fact-check it for you. You can also read all our fact-checked stories here.)

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