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Jamia Millia Students Demand Polls, Hunger Strike Enters 7th Day

Jamia Millia Islamia students allege the admin is using the excuse of sub-judice to refrain from conducting polls.

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Students protesting on the campus of Jamia Milia. 
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Students of the Jamia Milia Islamic University, on 31 October, alleged that the university administration was trying to find an “escape route” out of student elections, citing the matter to be sub-judice.

The students have been on a hunger strike since 25 October to demand students union elections in the varsity.

The administration was also accused of not keeping its word to the Delhi High Court that the students union elections would be conducted as per the Lyngdoh Committee recommendations.

In a statement, protesting Jamia students said:

The Jamia administration has been looking for an escape route by stating that the case regarding the students’ union is sub-judice before the Delhi High Court. The reality is, Jamia had in 2012 assured the court that there is no discomfort and objection to elections as well as an elected student body.

The varsity administration had also said that they would first conduct the students' council election for the first two years. Thereafter, the JMI can hold the students' union polls according to the Lyngdoh Committee recommendations, they said.

Reacting to the administration's argument, the students said that the person who had filed the writ petition regarding the election and nine others who had impleaded in the petition were no longer students of the university. "...hence the responsibilities lie with the JMI," they said, adding that the administration is guilty of contempt of court as it has shown reluctance in conducting elections.

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