ADVERTISEMENT

Explained: What's in the Anti-Doping Bill Recently Passed in Lok Sabha?

If the bill passes in RS, the NADA will have the power to conduct raids at any premises on suspicion of doping.

Published
India
3 min read
Explained: What's in the Anti-Doping Bill Recently Passed in Lok Sabha?
i

The Lok Sabha on Wednesday, 27 July, passed the National Anti-Doping Bill in an effort to put a halt to doping in sports.

This comes close on the heels of an incident in which five members of India's contingent for the 2022 Commonwealth Games failed their anti-doping tests.

The passage of the bill comes as a shot in the arm for the National Anti-Doping Agency (NADA), which will have its powers enhanced should the bill pass in the Rajya Sabha and become law.

Explained: What's in the Anti-Doping Bill Recently Passed in Lok Sabha?

  1. 1. What is Doping?

    Doping is the practice of using banned performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) by athletes.

    The aim of doping, as the name implies, is to increase one's ability to perform at an event. In broad terms, this is achieved through enhancing muscle mass, getting an artificial boost in energy ahead of a sporting event, reducing recovery time, and concealing the effects of other drugs.

    The first official case of doping was reported during the 1904 Olympics, and has, since then, plagued the world of sports.

    Expand
  2. 2. What is the Anti-Doping Bill All About?

    The bill aims to grant greater powers to the National Anti-Doping Agency to conduct investigations, searches, and seizures, and ensure the proper functioning of the National Dope Testing Laboratory (NDTL).

    In official terms, the NADA will have the power of "levying sanctions for anti-doping rule violations, the disciplinary procedures to be adopted and the powers of inspection, sample collection and sharing and free flow of information."

    Currently, the NADA does not have the power to conduct raids if it suspects or has proof of doping activities ongoing in any premises, including national camps.

    These provisions gain prominence amid a rising concern with regard to doping in India over the years.

    The country was placed at the third position among nations with the most doping violations, as per a 2019 report by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Russia and Italy are the only two countries that surpassed India in this regard.

    Expand
  3. 3. Punishment for Anti-Doping Violations if Bill Becomes Law

    If the bill is passed in the Rajya Sabha and becomes law, any rule violation with regard to anti-doping policies will result in disqualification of a sportsperson's results, including forfeiture of medals, points, and prizes, ineligibility to participate in a competition or event for a prescribed period, and financial sanctions.

    The bill also involves the restructuring of the NADA from a society to a statutory body. Accordingly, it will be led by a government-appointed director general.

    Further, a National Board for Anti-Doping will also be created to make suggestions to the government to keep a check on the practice, and ensure compliance with global rules and regulations in this regard.

    Expand
  4. 4. 'Aim to Become World Leaders in Sports': Anurag Thakur

    Amid a debate on the bill on Wednesday, Sports Minister Anurag Thakur said that it would promote sports and protect the interests of sportspersons in the country.

    "The government is collaborating with IIT, National Institute for Pharmaceutical Education and Research, CSIR, National Forensic Science University and all other scientific agencies in the country so that we become world leaders in the coming years for Indian athletes," Thakur asserted.

    Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) MP Manoj Tiwari, meanwhile, said that the bill would prevent unnecessary litigation between sportspersons and the NADA, which currently does not have backing from the legislature.

    He also highlighted the need to educate sportspersons regarding the pitfalls of doping.

    The bill was initially tabled in the Lower House in December 2021, after which it was referred to a parliamentary standing committee.
    Expand
  5. 5. Anti-Doping Violations Ahead of 2022 Commonwealth Games

    Five anti-doping violations had taken place ahead of the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

    Jumper Aishwarya Babu, who was deemed to be one of India's prime contenders to win a medal in the games, failed her doping test during the National Inter-State Athletics Championships held last month.

    Sprinter S Dhanalakshmi was also barred for allegedly using illegal chemical substances, which came to light after her test was carried out by the Athletics Integrity United (AIU). She was the country's only participant in the women's 100m race, and a member of the 400m relay team.

    Two para-athletes – Shotputter Aneesh Kumar and powerlifter Geeta Teotia – also failed their tests. While Kumar was barred from participation due to the use of a masking agent, Teotia is said to have used an anabolic steroid.

    (At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

    Expand

What is Doping?

Doping is the practice of using banned performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) by athletes.

The aim of doping, as the name implies, is to increase one's ability to perform at an event. In broad terms, this is achieved through enhancing muscle mass, getting an artificial boost in energy ahead of a sporting event, reducing recovery time, and concealing the effects of other drugs.

The first official case of doping was reported during the 1904 Olympics, and has, since then, plagued the world of sports.

ADVERTISEMENT

What is the Anti-Doping Bill All About?

The bill aims to grant greater powers to the National Anti-Doping Agency to conduct investigations, searches, and seizures, and ensure the proper functioning of the National Dope Testing Laboratory (NDTL).

In official terms, the NADA will have the power of "levying sanctions for anti-doping rule violations, the disciplinary procedures to be adopted and the powers of inspection, sample collection and sharing and free flow of information."

Currently, the NADA does not have the power to conduct raids if it suspects or has proof of doping activities ongoing in any premises, including national camps.

These provisions gain prominence amid a rising concern with regard to doping in India over the years.

The country was placed at the third position among nations with the most doping violations, as per a 2019 report by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Russia and Italy are the only two countries that surpassed India in this regard.

Punishment for Anti-Doping Violations if Bill Becomes Law

If the bill is passed in the Rajya Sabha and becomes law, any rule violation with regard to anti-doping policies will result in disqualification of a sportsperson's results, including forfeiture of medals, points, and prizes, ineligibility to participate in a competition or event for a prescribed period, and financial sanctions.

The bill also involves the restructuring of the NADA from a society to a statutory body. Accordingly, it will be led by a government-appointed director general.

Further, a National Board for Anti-Doping will also be created to make suggestions to the government to keep a check on the practice, and ensure compliance with global rules and regulations in this regard.

ADVERTISEMENT

'Aim to Become World Leaders in Sports': Anurag Thakur

Amid a debate on the bill on Wednesday, Sports Minister Anurag Thakur said that it would promote sports and protect the interests of sportspersons in the country.

"The government is collaborating with IIT, National Institute for Pharmaceutical Education and Research, CSIR, National Forensic Science University and all other scientific agencies in the country so that we become world leaders in the coming years for Indian athletes," Thakur asserted.

Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) MP Manoj Tiwari, meanwhile, said that the bill would prevent unnecessary litigation between sportspersons and the NADA, which currently does not have backing from the legislature.

He also highlighted the need to educate sportspersons regarding the pitfalls of doping.

The bill was initially tabled in the Lower House in December 2021, after which it was referred to a parliamentary standing committee.

Anti-Doping Violations Ahead of 2022 Commonwealth Games

Five anti-doping violations had taken place ahead of the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

Jumper Aishwarya Babu, who was deemed to be one of India's prime contenders to win a medal in the games, failed her doping test during the National Inter-State Athletics Championships held last month.

Sprinter S Dhanalakshmi was also barred for allegedly using illegal chemical substances, which came to light after her test was carried out by the Athletics Integrity United (AIU). She was the country's only participant in the women's 100m race, and a member of the 400m relay team.

Two para-athletes – Shotputter Aneesh Kumar and powerlifter Geeta Teotia – also failed their tests. While Kumar was barred from participation due to the use of a masking agent, Teotia is said to have used an anabolic steroid.

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

ADVERTISEMENT
Edited By :Saundarya Talwar
Speaking truth to power requires allies like you.
Become a Quint Insider
25
100
200

or more

PREMIUM

3 months
12 months
12 months
Check Insider Benefits
ADVERTISEMENT
Stay Updated

Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter And Get News Delivered Straight To Your Inbox.

Join over 120,000 subscribers!
ADVERTISEMENT
×
×