How India’s Rare Moment in History Found Space in London’s Columns

Here’s how the British press covered India’s independence. 

Updated
India
2 min read
Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru at the Red Fort on August 15, 1947 (Courtesy: <a href="https://twitter.com/IndiaHistorypic">Twitter.com/IndianHistoryPics</a>)

As 200 years of British Rule in India came to a close, and at the “stroke of the midnight hour,” when The Times, London went to press, it announced the birth of India and Pakistan, as the last Viceroy of India Lord Mountbatten formally handed over power to the two state leaders — Jawaharlal Nehru and Mohammad Ali Jinnah.

(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)
Lord Mountbatten with wife Edwina, saluting as he handed over power (Courtesy: Youtube.com/BritishPathe)
Lord Mountbatten with wife Edwina, saluting as he handed over power (Courtesy: Youtube.com/BritishPathe)

The Times depicted a map of independent India, accompanied by a tribute to the men of the British Army that had fought here.

(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)

The publication also highlighted Pandit Nehru’s iconic speech — Tryst with Destiny.

(Photo: The Times, London)
(Photo: The Times, London)

UK’s Life magazine also had a special issue on Lord Mountbatten, on the occasion of India’s independence, on August 15, 1947.

(Courtesy: <a href="https://twitter.com/IndiaHistorypic">Twitter.com/IndianHistoryPics</a>)
(Courtesy: Twitter.com/IndianHistoryPics)

And across the border, Pakistan recorded its own moment of glory in the Dawn.

How India’s Rare Moment in History Found Space in London’s Columns
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