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Chanting Bharat Mata ki Jai Doesn’t Determine Nationalism: Tharoor

Tharoor spoke on ‘JNU and Nationalism’ outside the administrative hall of JNU which has been the centre of protests.

Updated
India
2 min read
Shashi Tharoor at Jawaharlal Nehru University. (Photo: YouTube Screengrab)

Taking a dig at the ruling BJP over its stand on the JNU row, Congress leader Shashi Tharoor said, at midnight on Sunday, that nationalism is now decided by whether one can say Bharat Mata Ki Jai or not.

He said people should have the right to choose what they believe is correct and still be tolerant of others’ ideas in a democracy.

Today, nationalism is decided by whether or not one can say Bharat Mata Ki Jai. I am happy to say it, but should I also oblige everyone to say it? Our Constitution gives people the right not to say it just as it gives people the right to not say it. I will choose when to say it and that’s democracy.
Shashi Tharoor

Tharoor said our country is not just ‘Hindi, Hindu and Hindustan’, it is called India. He added, one must accept the diversity within the country.

Also read: Tharoor Hits Back: Muslims Have Right to Dissent on Loyalty Test

If we understand that the Indian civilisation allows many religions, celebrates a range of opinions and is today sustained by constitutional democracy which stands for certain values that all of us claim as our own, if this is the Indian legacy we can live, then we can all stand under that flag and celebrate.

Tharoor was speaking on ‘JNU and Nationalism’ outside the administrative hall of the varsity which has been the centre of protests ever since sedition charges were slapped on three students.

Tharoor appreciated the students for stirring a debate on vital issues in India, saying student days are the days “to expand one’s consciousness”.

You may have come here for education but you are also educating the nation. What is happening here has given the whole nation an education on the vital issues of dissent and democracy, sedition and, of course, ‘azaadi’ (freedom).

Tharoor’s nearly 40-minute long speech was dotted with historical anecdotes and personal experiences and he repeatedly quoted personalities like Jawaharlal Nehru and Everlyn Beatrice Hall to drive home the idea of tolerance and diversity and their importance in India.

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

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