From the early 70s up to 1977, India’s college students revolutionised politics, education and protests.
From the early 70s up to 1977, India’s college students revolutionised politics, education and protests.(Photo courtesy: Guruprasad.net)
  • 1. That 70s Campus
  • 2. Hyderabad: Jeena Hai to Marna Seekho
  • 3. Gujarat: Navnirman Andolan
  • 4. JP Movement: Student Protest And Satyagraha
  • 5. The Sabbatical and the (Almost) Victory
  • 6. Legacy of the JP Movement
George Reddy to JP: How Student Protests in the 70s Shook Up India

Did you know? The Sampoorna Kranti Express travels from Patna to Delhi – a distance of over 1,000 kilometres – in less than 14 hours. It’s one of the fastest trains in India at the moment.

And it’s named after a protest in the 70s - Sampoorna Kranti aka Total Revolution - which spread to every corner of India, toppled a government, created dozens of political parties, and left behind the most important legacy of all – organised public dissent.

And all of this began with a bunch of hungry, angry, college students. Welcome to the world of a 25-year-old gold medalist in physics who was also a kick-boxer, a 26-year-old Lalu Prasad Yadav, the Beatles and Bobby!

Today, the nationwide protests against the CAA and the NRC have gained prominence, strength and global support thanks to the students of Jamia Millia Islamia University in Delhi. In this context, the Bihar Movement, aka JP Movement is a forerunner, from which one can take lessons and the way forward.

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