ADVERTISEMENT

Cyberbullying: India Has Higher Number of Kids as Victims & Perpetrators

McAfee surveyed 11,567 participants in the age group 10-18 years across 10 countries.

Updated
Cyber
3 min read

Video Producer: Mayank Chawla

Video Editor: Harpal Rawat

Bullying on the internet is not a new phenomenon. Various surveys have shown that children in India are at risk of falling prey to bullies online, and that can have a lasting impact on their mental health.

But what is the extent of cyberbullying in India? Are children participating in cyberbullying, too? And how are parents reacting to these cases? A survey finds out.

McAfee's 'Cyberbullying in Plain Sight' surveyed children from ages 10 to 18.

(Illustration: Deeksha Malhotra/The Quint)

A McAfee report titled 'Cyberbullying in Plain Sight' revealed that 85 percent of surveyed children in India have been victims of cyberbullying, the highest in the world. The survey also found that three out of four children in India have engaged in cyberbullying.

The global security software company surveyed 11,567 participants in the age group 10-18 years across 10 countries.
ADVERTISEMENT

What Constitutes Cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying is the use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threatening nature.

Severe forms of cyberbullying, such as sexual harassment, threats of personal harm, trolling, doxing, name-calling, spreading false rumours, and being excluded from groups and conversations, have also been included in this study.

Racism, Sexual Harassment Highest in India

The survey found that India has the highest rate of racist cyberbullying in the world. As many as 42 percent of Indian children have been the victims of racist cyberbullying, which is significantly higher than the rest of the world at 28 percent.

In its most extreme forms, cyberbullying in India was reported almost twice as high as the international average. Here's a comparison between India and the global numbers.

In its most extreme forms, cyberbullying in India was reported almost twice as high as the international average.

(Illustration: Deeksha Malhotra/The Quint)

An age-based analysis of data shows that younger children are more susceptible to cyberbullying. The lack of awareness at younger ages could be a factor here.

One in three kids faces cyber-racism, sexual harassment, and threats of physical harm as early as the age of 10.

Moreover, young girls in India routinely find themselves targeted for sexual harassment and threats of personal harm. These rates are some of the highest internationally, with girls 10 to 14 at 32 percent and girls 15 to 16 at 34 percent. However, this figure drops significantly at ages 17 to 18, down to 21 percent.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Perpetrators 

The issue is equally worrying with regards to the perpetrators of cyberbullying. The report stated that three out of four Indian children say that they have cyberbullied someone else.

  • <div class="paragraphs"><p>Children are knowingly or unknowingly indulging in cyberbullying.</p></div>

    Children are knowingly or unknowingly indulging in cyberbullying.

    (Illustration: Deeksha Malhotra/The Quint)

ADVERTISEMENT

Parental Involvement 

Another part of the survey looked at how parents responded to such cases and whether these response patterns discouraged children from confiding in their parents.

The survey found that Indian children are more likely to hide their cyberbullying experiences from their parents.

  • 01/03

    Indian children are more likely to hide their cyberbullying experiences from their parents.

    Photo Credit:  The Quint

    <div class="paragraphs"><p>Indian children are more likely to hide their cyberbullying experiences from their parents.</p></div>
  • 02/03

    Quite often, children address these issues by themselves.

    Photo Credit:  The Quint

    <div class="paragraphs"><p>Quite often, children address these issues by themselves.</p></div>
  • 03/03

    Parents are more likely to resort to external resources.

    Photo Credit:  The Quint

    <div class="paragraphs"><p>Parents are more likely to resort to external resources.</p></div>
"Parents are displaying important gaps of knowledge around cyberbullying, but even more concerning, children aren’t considering behaviours like jokes and name-calling harmful online. Our mission with this research is to inform parents and families of what children are experiencing online and then empower parents to act where appropriate."
Gagan Singh, Chief Product Officer, McAfee

This also means that a lot of times, children address these issues by themselves, which involves either deleting a social media account to avoid cyberbullying (58 percent) or talking to their friends about it (87 percent). The global average for both these statistics are 33 percent and 25 percent, respectively.

(At The Quint, we are answerable only to our audience. Play an active role in shaping our journalism by becoming a member. Because the truth is worth it.)

Read and Breaking News at the Quint, browse for more from cyber

Topics:  cyberbullying   Children Safety   McAfee 

ADVERTISEMENT
Published: 
Speaking truth to power requires allies like you.
Become a Quint Insider
25
100
200

or more

PREMIUM

3 months
12 months
12 months
Check Insider Benefits
Read More
ADVERTISEMENT
Stay Updated

Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter And Get News Delivered Straight To Your Inbox.

Join over 120,000 subscribers!
ADVERTISEMENT
More News
×
×