Remembering Tyeb Mehta – a Gentle Soul Haunted by Violence
Six years after his death, Tyeb Mehta remains one of India’s most expensive artists. (Photo Courtesy: <a href="http://www.tyebmehta.in/">www.tyebmehta.in</a>)
Six years after his death, Tyeb Mehta remains one of India’s most expensive artists. (Photo Courtesy: www.tyebmehta.in)

Remembering Tyeb Mehta – a Gentle Soul Haunted by Violence

As a young journalist at Reuters in 2002, I remember the front page making prominent mention of an artist named Tyeb Mehta. His name was at the time new to the masses – they had heard of no one else but MF Husain. I was vaguely aware that Tyeb was part of the significant Progressive Artists Group of India, set up in 1947. But that was about it.

The brilliance of this low key artist was finally recognised by the auction market. Eventually though, we all woke up to this gem amongst us. Celebration, a large canvas triptych became the first most expensive piece of Indian art to be auctioned at Christie’s in 2002 for $300,000.

That single event became the turning point for Indian art.

Tyeb Mehta, second from right. (Photo Courtesy: Facebook/<a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Artist-through-the-lens/971453229549462?sk=photos_stream">Artist through the lens</a>)
Tyeb Mehta, second from right. (Photo Courtesy: Facebook/Artist through the lens)

There was a brief lull till another Tyeb painting ensured the Indian art market broke into the million-dollar club – effectively putting India on the global art map. The work, titled Mahishasura – a reinterpretation of the tale of the demon by the same name – happened to be the first Indian painting to cross the million-dollar mark, selling for a whopping $1.584 million at Christie’s in 2005.

‘Mahisasura’, a Tyeb Mehta painting was the first Indian painting to cross the million dollar mark. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)
‘Mahisasura’, a Tyeb Mehta painting was the first Indian painting to cross the million dollar mark. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)

That was the clincher. Tyeb’s auction records since have been unconstrained. Pull out any list of India’s top selling art works and you will find Tyeb’s name prominently dominating. In fact, each time a new Tyeb piece was introduced to the market, it broke its previous record to create a new one.

Tyeb’s Tryst With Violence

But unlike the better known Husain, Tyeb was shy – silently working in his Mumbai studio and barely producing six to seven large works in a year. No surprises then that he created just about 200 paintings in his entire career.

As demand for his art kept catapulting, however, his style and pace of work never changed. True to his innate sense of self, he continued to spend months on one work, living with it, analysing it, criticising it and finally deciding whether to complete it or destroy it totally.

‘Falling Figure’, a Tyeb Mehta painting. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)
‘Falling Figure’, a Tyeb Mehta painting. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)

This habit of his shocked many of his own friends in the art world. So harsh was he on himself that if a painting he’d created didn’t match his standards, he would destroy the entire canvas.

Today, six years after his death, I can remember the moment I first met him. He was frail and sweet. I couldn’t imagine how someone that soft-spoken and gentle could create works pulsating with such forceful, violent energy. Mehta would show violence quite frequently in his work – but it was not because he was fascinated by it.

On the contrary, violence had haunted him since childhood – he was constantly reminded of the man he had seen being beaten to death below his home, during the Partition riots in India. The sight of a trussed bull being dragged inside a slaughterhouse in Mumbai once moved him to tears.

‘Rickshaw Puller’, a Tyeb Mehta painting. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)
‘Rickshaw Puller’, a Tyeb Mehta painting. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)

Tyeb’s strategy was simple – he aspired to make peace with violence. His paintings were mostly about falling figures, Kolkata’s manual rickshaw pullers and the trussed bull. He liked keeping his works minimal. There were often large blocks of plain colour, revealing little texture.

Little-known Anecdotes of a Fascinating Life

WhenI met Tyeb in 2005, it was at an evening celebrating the success of ‘Mahishasura’. It coincided with the launch of a book on his entire career. As I recall, his friends SH Raza and MF Husain were also present that night – making it a phenomenal occasion, probably the last time the three stalwarts were seen together. (Raza would spend most of his time in Paris and Husain had soon left forDubai.)

MF Husain driving his Ferrari. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)
MF Husain driving his Ferrari. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)

Onecould tell that Tyeb wasn’t comfortable with all the attention. He liked ‘Mahishasura’ but couldn’t understand what all the fuss was about. He asked me if ‘Mahishasura’ was my favourite Tyeb work. I emphatically said NO – my favourite wasthe awe inspiring triptych ‘Celebration’, I told him. He was elated to hear my reply.

‘Celebration’, the&nbsp;first most expensive piece of Indian art to be auctioned at Christie’s in 2002. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)
‘Celebration’, the first most expensive piece of Indian art to be auctioned at Christie’s in 2002. (Photo Courtesy: Sahar Zaman)

Hewas conscious each time he spoke to my camera. His voice was affected by thethroat operations he’d undergone but the language of his brush continued to produceworks that haven’t quenched the blue chip art market’s hunger even today. Justlast year in December 2014, an untitled work of his auctioned for $2.8 millionat Christie’s – ensuring Mehta remains one of the most expensive artists fromIndia.

(Sahar Zaman is an independent newscaster, arts journalist and curator. She has founded Asia’s first web channel on the arts, Hunar TV.)

(This article was first published on 7 July 2015 and is being reposted from The Quint’s archives on the birth anniversary of Tyeb Mehta.)

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