Australia to do ‘Barefoot Circle’ for Anti-racism Movement

The Women’s Big Bash League is using the ‘Barefoot Circles’ to spread message against racism.

Published
Cricket
2 min read
Australian captain Aaron Finch speaks to his team in a huddle.
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Fast bowler Pat Cummins on Monday conceded that the Australia men's cricket team had fallen behind in its recognition and education around racial injustice, adding that they will stand in a circle with bare feet at the start of every international series in solidarity with the anti-racism movement while also celebrating indigenous culture.

"We've decided to do the Barefoot Circle. We're going to look at doing it at the start of each series and it's a pretty easy decision for us. As soon as you try and learn a little bit about it, it just becomes a really easy decision. Not only as a sport, but we as people are absolutely against racism," Cummins said as per ESPNcricinfo.

"We can probably put our hands up and say we haven't done enough in the past and we want to get better, so this is one small thing we're going to introduce this summer," he added.

The Barefoot Circle is a statement taken up by Australian cricket more broadly to connect with Aboriginal culture and the land on which matches are played. The Women's Big Bash League is using the 'Barefoot Circles' to spread message against racism.

Australian team barefoot during a training session. 
Australian team barefoot during a training session. 
(Image: ICC)

Cummins said that while individual players would be free to make their own statements, including taking a knee, the Barefoot Circle had been deemed the best way for the team to begin to acknowledge that in addressing racism, both at home and around the world, they have a fair amount of work to do.

"In addition, we're going to work a lot on our education. We're trying to learn as much about our history in Australia in particular moving forward and look forward to doing the Barefoot Circle. I thought NAIDOC week last week in the Sheffield Shield that was quite a powerful opening day. And of course in the WBBL, seeing a lot of great acts there as well," the 27-year-old said.

Former West Indies pace bowler Michael Holding had lashed out at Aaron Finch and Eoin Morgan last month for not continuing with the knee gesture that began with the West Indies tour of England but was discontinued when Pakistan and Australia toured England. Finch had then said that specific gestures need not be done.

Australia will be hosting India in three ODIs, three T20Is and four Test matches beginning November 27.

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