Datsun is all set to launch the AMT variant of the Redi-Go. 
Auto Reviews

Datsun Redi-Go AMT First Drive: Makes City Driving Enjoyable 

Datsun’s competition with Maruti Suzuki Alto and Renault KWID has been missing one basic function which promises to change the driving dynamics in the entry-level segment. And the company is ready to fill that vacuum with its AMT variant of the Redi-Go, which will be launching later this month.

The pocket-friendly hatchback has undergone regular overhauling ever since its debut two years ago, and is now coming out with an AMT variant which feels like a normal progression. We got a chance to take the Redi-Go one-litre AMT variant for a spin around Delhi, and here’s what we think the car manages to offer in the automatic avatar.

Same old Redi-Go one-litre which was launched in 2017. 

Design

The sharp character lines, flowing design and tall boy stance have been retained, making the Redi-Go a good looking entry-level hatchback. It has a nice sporty stance and signature Datsun design elements such as the unique trapezoidal grille.

The interiors of the AMT variant remains the same, as the one we saw on the standard one-litre variant in 2017, offering black leather seats and chrome finishing on the panel.

Also Read: Datsun Redi-GO 1.0L First Drive Review: Old Bottle, New Wine

Black leather seats are also there. No design changes whatsoever. 

Datsun’s conventional approach at the back has been well-documented, and that continues to be the case even with the AMT variant. The instrument cluster still remains the same, except for the gear indicator that can be seen on the left side of the speedometer.

Textured plastic finishing on the dashboard. 

The power window buttons could have been better placed, as they are quite a task to reach. With 185-mm of space underneath, the redi-Go can go over some of the harshest speedbreakers without scraping the bottom, and it is still their segment-leading feature.

While driving you’ll see the gear switching on the left of the small orange-coloured screen. 

The design changes are few and far between, and nothing home to write about with this one as well.

Power

The AMT variant carries the same one-litre iSat petrol engine that offers 67 BHP of power and 91 NM of torque. But the big difference is the addition of a standard automatic manual transmission (AMT) gearbox, which doesn’t look anything like the circular dial on the Renault Kwid AMT.

Datsun uses a one-litre Redi-Go engine. 

Since it’s an AMT variant (five-speed transmission), the new Redi-Go misses out on the clutch, which frees up your left leg while driving and brings added responsibility on the brakes to switch between Drive-Reverse-Neutral on the car. The switch from 800cc to one-litre engine did bump up the power on offer, and that’s exactly the case with this one also.

This AMT gear lever lets you switch between manual and automatic drive modes. 
No clutch frees your left leg. 

The linear power delivery ensures your ride is smoother, and offers ample torque to drive past a car or two with added foot pressure applied on the gas.

Drive — AMT Makes a Difference

So, how was our experience driving the AMT variant of the one-litre Redi-Go? To put it in simple words – enjoyable. Driving around the city without constantly changing gears was such a relief.

Traffic in Delhi is mostly bumper-to-bumper, and in such cases, it was intriguing to see how this automatic gearbox adjusted itself when put into work. And I am pleased to say that the AMT passed our test with flying colours in close and congested spaces on the road.

It all comes down to the pricing of the AMT variant now. 

Having said that, there were times when the gearbox had a tough time figuring out whether I am moving or standing still, but that’s just nitpicking for the sake of it.

Also, it was quite fascinating to note the speed-difference between which the gears shifted automatically.

Gear Switch Difference

  • 1st Gear - Up to 3Km/hr
  • 2nd Gear - 4 to 15 Km/hr
  • 3rd Gear - 15-25 Km/hr
  • 4th Gear - 30km/hr to 40km/hr
  • 5th Gear - 45 Km/hr onwards

While the gear switches were quite linear and done in a balanced state, it was hard for me to understand its reading of the speed while making the switch.

You get 185mm ground clearance and 222-litre of boot space. 
At one point, I was driving at 35 km/hr in traffic and it switched to the fourth gear. 

Again, this could just have been the case with my review variant, but if that isn’t the case then some tweaking is needed at the workshop before the car makes its way to the market.

What we Think?

Datsun will launch the Redi-Go AMT variant later this month. 

Datsun has done a fine job with the AMT variant of the Redi-Go. Driving around without switching gears was a pleasant experience. Apart from AMT, the car is exactly the same as the standard one-litre variant, and we’ve got no qualms about that. You get the same power delivery, same ground clearance and the same interior finishing which we saw on the 1-litre model in 2017.

If Datsun manages to prices this one between 3.7 to 4 lakh in the current, this AMT avatar of Redi-Go could work out as a competent alternative to the Maruti Suzuki Alto or Renault Kwid AMT.

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